wordpress

Creator Toolkit

I Have a New Podcast: Creator Toolkit

I’ve been mulling this idea in my head for about a month now. See, in the last 2 years running How I Built It, a podcast that has gained some shocking popularity, I’ve realized something. Podcasting is the most fun part of my day. I love interviewing people and publishing to such a great medium. I’m good at talking and have been since I was a kid. I want to keep podcasting, and I have other ideas. One is Creator Toolkit, a show I think would compliment How I Built It very nicely.

Get the Free Gutenberg Checklist

Gutenberg Hits the Mainstream with WordPress 4.9.8

Last week, the WordPress Core Team released 4.9.8, which among other things, included the “Try Gutenberg” call to action. Since then, the amount of Gutenberg installs have exploded (63,000+ on day one – about 17% of all installs). Whether you’ve know about the new editor for a while, or just hear about it this week, it’s sure to have an impact on your website and business. Because of that, I’ve put together a free Gutenberg checklist for you.

Ugh, clients. Am I Right?

Clients Always Mess Things Up

Imagine you’re buying a new phone. You walk into the store and you overhear a conversation with 2 of the sales clerks. One says to the other, “Ugh. One of my customers put an ugly case on the beautiful iPhone I gave them. Customers are so stupid. They always mess things up.” You probably wouldn’t want them helping you buy a new phone. Why would you want that kind of ridicule? Wouldn’t you take your business elsewhere? But somehow, we think it’s OK to say this about clients pretty regularly.

11 Great WooCommerce Tools

11 Great Tools for Your WooCommerce Store

I just got back from WordCamp Grand Rapids, and the theme of the camp was tools and services to make WordPress better. I spoke about some tools I use for Creator Courses, specifically revolving around the e-commerce portion. I also learned about some great WooCommerce tools from the attendees. I’d love to share some of them with you.

Much like this lightblub, WordPress Plugins click on to your site.

WordPress Plugins I Can’t Live Without

I work with WordPress on a daily basis. By working within my own sites, setting up new sites, and testing new things, I come across a lot of WordPress tools. As a result, I have a group of WordPress plugins that I’ve come to rely on. There are some that are site specific (like WooCommerce and LearnDash on this site), but there are also those plugins I install on every single WordPress site I set up. Here’s a list of those WordPress plugins in no particular order.

How much does it cost to build a WordPress website?

So you need to buy a car. You start by setting a budget and picking a make and model you like. Determine if you want new or used. Do some research online; perhaps you consult a Kelly Blue Book. Then, armed with a good idea of what you need, what you’d like, and how much you can spend, you go to the car dealer. You shop around a bit. But you know for sure, if you want a Ford Fusion, you’re paying between $20K and $25K. There’s a sticker price and most dealers will stay within a few thousand of that. But what about website cost?

Patreon WordPress Membership

Make an Easy Membership Site with WordPress and Patreon

This week I wrote about how I’m doubling down on Patreon to deliver more quality content to my backers. Well, things have just gotten a lot easier for me, because their timing is impeccable.

Patreon has recently release a WordPress plugin that allows you to take posts on your blog and make them viewable to Patrons only. This allows us to make membership sites quickly and easily, without having to worry about processing payments or subscriptions. In this video tutorial, I show you exactly how to make a Patreon WordPress Membership Site.

Hosted Platform vs. Your Own Platform: How Do You Choose?

When I was in grammar school (or primary school, depending on where you live), we had a fenced-in slab of pavement where the students could play during recess. It was…kinda boring, but it was highly unlikely we’d get hit by a car. We were protected. There was also this HUGE, open field across the street. On good days, our teachers would supervise us as we crossed the street, to the heavenly field where we could run free. Those were the highlights of recess. We could do basically whatever we wanted, from play soccer, to just run around. We had freedom, even if it was at the expense of a little safety.

Now that I’m an adult, recess is a long missed part of the day. But I still have a similar choice when it comes to a lot of things: do I want to be sheltered & safe, or do I want freedom, even if that freedom lets me break things? A hosted platform vs. something self-hosted like WordPress is one of those choices.