Code

Gutenberg Price Table

Creating a Responsive Gutenberg Price Table

Last week I worked on an upcoming tutorial for a popular online publication on how to style the Gutenberg Columns block (I’ll be sure to send that along when it comes out). As as result, I decided to experiment to see what you could reasonable do, and came up with this Gutenberg Price Table: https://codepen.io/jcasabona/pen/RYvEYd. In this tutorial, we’ll go over some of the things we need to do to make this happen.

Coding as my Side Hustle

Coding Projects as my Side Hustle

I did some thinking over the weekend, after I wrote the post about my learning plan. I looked at my project pipeline. I looked at what people were hiring me to do, and I reviewed the next few personal projects I’m working on. You know what I saw? No coding projects. Honestly, I shouldn’t. That’s no longer my core business. I turn down freelance jobs 90% of the time. But I still want to write code. I will have to for some of the online courses I’m taking. Luckily, there’s the whole idea of a “side hustle,” and since I made my side hustle my main gig last year, my side hustle has an opening.

How I Launched Creator Courses in One Week

7 months ago I took my business full-time. Being a freelancer for most of my life, and even doing it full-time for a while after college, I thought I had a pretty good handle on how things would work. But as it turns out, the product space is a lot harder to work in than the services space (for me). I’ve lamented over the last few months that it’s easier for me to sell one person on a $5,000 project, than 100 people on a $50 course. But after attending CaboPress and participating in an amazing Master Mind group, I was able to get some perspective and readjust. The Autumn and Winter have been much better than the Summer.

But what does that have to do with a new site I launched called Creator Courses? Everything! I decided that as well as do an intro course on Gutenberg, I would launch a new brand. Here’s how I did it, and why.

How I Built my WordPress Development Course on Udemy

My course has been out for 6 weeks and I’ve been promoting it on social media and in my newsletter; if you subscribe to any of those places you know it’s currently available. The cat’s out of the bag. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have more to tell about it. See, I originally set out to make this an announcement post. The fanfare, the glitz, and the glamore. But man, there’s been a lot on my plate and when that happens, my blog is always the first to suffer. That’s OK though! I’m back and I’ll be making lots of more great content, starting with a question I usually ask people on my own podcast: how did I build my WordPress Development course?

Deleting 3 Million Spam Comments from a WordPress Database

Over at the Crowd Favorite blog, I wrote up a post about an interesting problem I solved recently. I laid out everything you need to know there, but it involves downloading a HUGE database and putting WP-CLI to good use. If you haven’t used it before and you do development with WordPress, it’s super valuable. Anyway, check out the post – it’s a good one!

Deleting 3 Million Spam Comments from Your WordPress Database

WordPress Helper Functions for Detecting IE

The other day I was working on a problem where I wanted to check if a website was using a specific browser (in this case IE) and version (in this case 9 or below). I came up with 2 functions that would serve an a nice, reusable check for both. These can also be extended to check for other browsers or versions, or even accept custom regular expressions.

Add IE Conditionals to wp_enqueue_style

When creating a WordPress theme, it’s best practice to use wp_enqueue_style for adding all stylesheets, including style.css. At first glance, this can pose a challenge if you want to conditionally include CSS based on the browser (like IE-only styles, for example). Luckily, there is a quick way to do this in WordPress using $wp-styles:

global $wp_styles;
wp_enqueue_style( 'jlc_ie_styles',get_template_directory_uri() . 'css/ie-style.css', array(), '1.0.0' );
$wp_styles->add_data( 'jlc_ie_styles', 'conditional', 'IE' );

The code above calls on the $wp-styles class to associate our IE-only stylesheet (by tag/name/slug) with a condition, the condition being “IE.” If you wanted IE 9 and below, you could do this:

$wp_styles->add_data( 'jlc_ie_styles', 'conditional', 'lte IE 9' );

This is a great (and best practice) way to conditionally call styles. You can see more examples with comments over in this gist by wpscholar.